Now China's killer virus spreads to AMERICA: Man in his 30s is hospitalised as death toll from SARS-like coronavirus hits nine, cases reach 450 and health chiefs are poised to declare a worldwide public health EMERGENCY

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  • Officials said the Washington man was hospitalized but in ‘good’ condition 
  • The man had travelled from Wuhan – the city at the centre of the outbreak 
  • China’s National Health Commission has urged travellers to not visit Wuhan 
  • US President Donald Trump has said America has a plan in place to contain the coronavirus outbreak
  • The World Health Organisation (WHO) is poised to declare the outbreak a public health emergency in a meeting in Geneva this afternoon
  • Travellers from the area of China at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak will be separated from other passengers on arrival at Heathrow
  • China’s National Health Commission has urged travellers to not visit Wuhan, the city at the centre of the outbreak 
  • Football and boxing qualifiers for the Tokyo Olympic Games will be moved from Wuhan to another location 
  • China has been accused of under-reporting cases, with experts saying it has a ‘track record’ and warning the ‘true picture may be completely different’  
  • Medics meeting each direct flight landing at Heathrow from Wuhan 
  • Aircraft announcements telling passengers to report if they are ill before landing 
  • Planes landing in an isolated area of Heathrow Terminal 4   
  • Medics meeting each direct flight landing at Heathrow from Wuhan 
  • Aircraft announcements telling passengers to report if they are ill before landing 
  • Planes landing in an isolated area of Heathrow Terminal 4   
  • North Korea has temporarily banned all tourists from entering the country over fears the Chinese coronavirus will spread
  • South Korean budget airline T’way Air has postponed the launch of its cheap flights to Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak 
  • A leading expert has said the coronavirus may have been lurking in animals for decades before adapting to infect humans
  • A renowned Chinese doctor investigating the outbreak has caught the killer SARS-like infection himself
  • Countries such as Russia, Kazakhstan and Malaysia have upped their screening methods to detect travellers with a fever in airports  
  • Residents in various Chinese cities are queuing to buy face masks as vendors sell the medical products for 10 times more than normal
  • Public health officials in the UK have instructed NHS hospitals on how to deal with cases amid fears the virus will spread  
  • Stock markets in China and Hong Kong dipped amid fears tourists will refrain from travelling, despite people being urged not to panic 
  • Furious families in China have accused hospitals of not testing patients with tell-tale symptoms.

An American man with the new coronavirus has been identified in Washington state, CDC officials said on Wednesday, bringing the total number of countries with cases of the deadly virus to five outside of China, including the US, Thailand, Japan South Korea and Taiwan 

Thai medical staff wear protective suits transfer a 70-year-old patient, who is suspected of having coronavirus infected after traveling back from Wuhan

Thai medical staff wear protective suits transfer a 70-year-old patient, who is suspected of having coronavirus infected after traveling back from Wuhan

A child wears a face mask at Hong Kong's international airport

A child wears a face mask at Hong Kong’s international airport

Travellers wear masks in the arrival hall of the Hong Kong International Airport amid fears the coronavirus outbreak will spread

Travellers wear masks in the arrival hall of the Hong Kong International Airport amid fears the coronavirus outbreak will spread

A Thai nurse works next to a campaign poster alerting patients of the coronavirus at a hospital in Bangkok. Four cases have been confirmed in Thailand

A Thai nurse works next to a campaign poster alerting patients of the coronavirus at a hospital in Bangkok. Four cases have been confirmed in Thailand

Staff move bio-waste containers past the entrance of the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where some infected with a new virus are being treated

Staff move bio-waste containers past the entrance of the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where some infected with a new virus are being treated

Malaysian officials use thermal imaging scanners and cameras to check passengers for fevers upon their arrival at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport

Malaysian officials use thermal imaging scanners and cameras to check passengers for fevers upon their arrival at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport

Despite the outbreak, the Australian women's soccer team is still preparing for a trip to Wuhan early next month for the Olympic qualifiers

Despite the outbreak, the Australian women’s soccer team is still preparing for a trip to Wuhan early next month for the Olympic qualifiers

People wearing face masks at a metro station in Taipei, Taiwan. Taiwan recorded its first case of the coronavirus this morning

People wearing face masks at a metro station in Taipei, Taiwan. Taiwan recorded its first case of the coronavirus this morning

Passengers leaving for Wuhan, waiting at the Leonardo Da Vinci airport in Fiumicino, Rome

Passengers leaving for Wuhan, waiting at the Leonardo Da Vinci airport in Fiumicino, Rome

Malaysia is one of many countries that have stepped up their passenger screening, with airport workers screening travellers for symptoms of the virus

Malaysia is one of many countries that have stepped up their passenger screening, with airport workers screening travellers for symptoms of the virus

Pictured: A close-up of travellers on the thermal imaging camera at Kuala Lumpur International Airport

Pictured: A close-up of travellers on the thermal imaging camera at Kuala Lumpur International Airport

South Korean cleaners prepare to disinfect the facilities at the customs, immigration and quarantine area at Incheon International Airport

South Korean cleaners prepare to disinfect the facilities at the customs, immigration and quarantine area at Incheon International Airport

Officials at Taiwan's Center for Disease Control use thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China's Wuhan province

Officials at Taiwan’s Center for Disease Control use thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China’s Wuhan province

A child wears a facemask at Daxing international airport in Beijing as he heads home for the Lunar New Year

A child wears a facemask at Daxing international airport in Beijing as he heads home for the Lunar New Year

Wang Guangfa has been infected with the new virus in China after being part of a team of doctors investigating it in Wuhan, where the virus emerged

Wang Guangfa has been infected with the new virus in China after being part of a team of doctors investigating it in Wuhan, where the virus emerged

The outbreak is believed to have started late last month among people connected to a seafood market in Wuhan, where all six fatalities have happened

The outbreak is believed to have started late last month among people connected to a seafood market in Wuhan, where all six fatalities have happened

Chinese quarantine workers wearing protective suits and masks are posted at an entrance to the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan

Chinese quarantine workers wearing protective suits and masks are posted at an entrance to the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan

An official uses an infrared thermometer on a traveler at a health screening checkpoint at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport. Wuhan is at the centre of the outbreak

An official uses an infrared thermometer on a traveler at a health screening checkpoint at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport. Wuhan is at the centre of the outbreak

Staff in biohazard suits hold a metal stretcher by the in-patient department of Wuhan Medical Treatment Centre, where patients are being treated for the new coronavirus

Staff in biohazard suits hold a metal stretcher by the in-patient department of Wuhan Medical Treatment Centre, where patients are being treated for the new coronavirus

This picture released by the Central Hospital of Wuhan shows a medic donning full-body hazardous  material suit looking after one patient who has been infected by a new deadly virus

This picture released by the Central Hospital of Wuhan shows a medic donning full-body hazardous  material suit looking after one patient who has been infected by a new deadly virus

Another medic in hazmat suit is seen checking the medical equipment inside the hospital's intensive care units. Nine people have been killed by the virus since it emerged last month

Another medic in hazmat suit is seen checking the medical equipment inside the hospital’s intensive care units. Nine people have been killed by the virus since it emerged last month

Doctors at the Central Hospital of Wuhan clench their fists to show their determination to fight the virus. 'Salute to the medical workers who fight on the front line!' the hospital said in a post

Doctors at the Central Hospital of Wuhan clench their fists to show their determination to fight the virus. ‘Salute to the medical workers who fight on the front line!’ the hospital said in a post

The never-before-seen pictures were taken inside the intensive care units of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of the hospital in Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak

The never-before-seen pictures were taken inside the intensive care units of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of the hospital in Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak

Quarantine workers spray disinfect at Incheon International Airport in South Korea. South Korea confirmed its first case on January 20 after a 35-year-old woman arriving at Seoul’s Incheon airport tested positive for the virus

Quarantine workers spray disinfect at Incheon International Airport in South Korea. South Korea confirmed its first case on January 20 after a 35-year-old woman arriving at Seoul’s Incheon airport tested positive for the virus

Pictures and videos circulating on the country's social media purport to show residents in various cities queuing to stock up on the medical products. A total of 317 people in Asia have now tested positive for the unnamed virus after it first emerged in Wuhan city last month

Pictures and videos circulating on the country’s social media purport to show residents in various cities queuing to stock up on the medical products. A total of 317 people in Asia have now tested positive for the unnamed virus after it first emerged in Wuhan city last month

Reports claim some vendors have hiked the price from £11 to £110 per box amid an alleged mask shortage. On Weibo, the Chinese equivalent to Twitter, web users reported to have seen huge lines of customers in and outside pharmacies in hope of buying the sought-after item

Reports claim some vendors have hiked the price from £11 to £110 per box amid an alleged mask shortage. On Weibo, the Chinese equivalent to Twitter, web users reported to have seen huge lines of customers in and outside pharmacies in hope of buying the sought-after item

Two patients in southern China have caught the virus from infected family members, according to local media. Pictured, Chinese residents wear masks in Wuhan

Two patients in southern China have caught the virus from infected family members, according to local media. Pictured, Chinese residents wear masks in Wuhan

China reported on January 20 the mysterious virus had spread across the country from Wuhan. Pictured, medical staff at Jinyintan hospital, Wuhan

China reported on January 20 the mysterious virus had spread across the country from Wuhan. Pictured, medical staff at Jinyintan hospital, Wuhan

Over the weekend, 136 fresh infections were reported in Wuhan, bringing the total number of cases China has confirmed to more than 200

Over the weekend, 136 fresh infections were reported in Wuhan, bringing the total number of cases China has confirmed to more than 200 

Over the weekend, 136 fresh infections were reported in Wuhan, bringing the total number of cases China has confirmed to more than 200

Over the weekend, 136 fresh infections were reported in Wuhan, bringing the total number of cases China has confirmed to more than 200 

The majority of patients have been traced to the Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market (pictured)

The majority of patients have been traced to the Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market (pictured)

Ash Shorley, 32, is fighting for his life in Thailand and is feared to be the first Western victim of the coronavirus sweeping across China

Ash Shorley, 32, is fighting for his life in Thailand and is feared to be the first Western victim of the coronavirus sweeping across China

Mr Shorley is in critical condition in a hospital in Phuket after being struck down with the pneumonia-like lung infection while visiting Koh Phi Phi island

Mr Shorley is in critical condition in a hospital in Phuket after being struck down with the pneumonia-like lung infection while visiting Koh Phi Phi island

The killer Chinese coronavirus which has killed nine people and struck down at least 473 has reached the US, it has been confirmed today.

Health officials said the unidentified man in his 30s, from Washington, has been  hospitalized but is in ‘good’ condition and is being closely monitored. 

The man had travelled back from the Chinese city of Wuhan which is at the centre of the outbreak. The disease is said to have originated from a seafood market that ‘conducted illegal transactions of wild animals’, but the US patient is not believed to have visited the stalls. 

The SARS-like outbreak has already spread to Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and Thailand. Australia has reported an as yet unconfirmed case. 

A total of 456 people are confirmed to have caught the unnamed coronavirus, which has never been seen before. Six patients have died.

Most of the cases have occurred in Wuhan, a city in Hubei province home to 11million people. But patients have been diagnosed across China, including in Beijing and Shanghai.

The coronavirus, which is from the same family as SARS, has also spread to South Korea, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan.

Chinese officials yesterday confirmed the virus has spread between humans, suggesting it can be passed through coughs and sneezes.

The outbreak is believed to have started late last month among people connected to a seafood market in Wuhan, which has since been shut.

China is entering its busiest travel period due to the Lunar New Year, which sees many people travelling back to their home town or village.

Virologists fear the increased travel that will happen over the holidays will cause a surge in cases.

So where have cases been recorded?

IN CHINA

Hubei province, 375 cases, 9 deaths

Guangdong province, 26 cases

Chongqing province, 5 cases 

Zhejiang province, 5 cases

Hainan province, 4 cases

Jiangxi, 2 cases 

Henan province, 1 case

Hunan province, 1 case

Yunnan province, 1 case 

Sichuan province, 2 cases 

Shandong province, 1 case

Fujian province, 1 case 

Shanxi province, 1 case 

Shanghai, 9 cases

Beijing, 10 cases

Tianjin, 2 cases 

Macau, 1 case 

Hong Kong, 1 case 

— 

ABROAD

Thailand, 4 cases

South Korea, 1 case

Japan, 1 case

Taiwan, 1 case

US, 1 case 

 Scientists are desperately trying to contain the outbreak, which officials have confirmed has passed between humans. It can cause a fever and lead to pneumonia.

 It comes as:  

Cases have risen nine-fold in the space of a few days, with just 48 confirmed cases on January 17. At least 20 healthcare workers have since been infected, including one doctor investigating the outbreak. Australia and the Philippines are investigating suspected cases of the coronavirus. 

The virus outbreak has coincided with China’s Lunar New Year celebrations this weekend, when millions travel at home and abroad for holidays and family reunions.

Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first American case yesterday.

Following the case, President Donald Trump today said that the US has a plan in place to contain the coronavirus outbreak.

Speaking on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, Trump said: ‘We do have a plan and we think it is going to be handled very well. 

‘We’ve already handled it very well. The CDC is terrific. Very professional…’ 

The unidentified man, from north of Seattle, is currently hospitalized and in ‘good’ condition but is being closely monitored in isolation. 

He traveled from Wuhan, but did not visit any of the markets at the epicenter of the outbreak, according to state health officials.   

The man arrived at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport – but not directly from Wuhan – on January 15, the day before screening was in place, and before he developed symptoms.

But he reportedly recognized his own symptoms – which typically include cough, fever and runny nose – after seeing online coverage of the virus. 

The patient reached out to doctors on January 16, was tested on the 17th and his diagnosis was confirmed Monday, health officials said.  

The patient is a resident of Snahomish County in Washington State and is currently at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett.

On the heels of the identification of this first US patient, all flights from Wuhan into the US are being rerouted to the three airports set up last week for screening – LAX, San Francisco and JFK – as well as an additional two locations: Chicago O’Hare and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.  

Vaccine experts at Baylor University are working on modifying a vaccine they designed to prevent SARS to protect against the new, related coronavirus.

But the school’s Dean of Tropical Medicine, which is developing the shot, Dr Peter Hotez, told DailyMail.com that it’s likely years away from deployment.

Travellers from the area of China at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak will be separated from other passengers on arrival at Heathrow Airport as UK health chiefs step up their response, it was announced today.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has said Public Health England is putting in place new precautions in relation to travellers to the UK from the region. 

Officials have today announced football and boxing qualifying matches held in Wuhan for the Tokyo Olympic Games will be moved from Wuhan.

Wuhan is at the centre of the ever-growing outbreak, which has sickened at least 450 people across Asia and spread to US. 

The Asian Football Confederation today said the women’s qualifiers being held at Wuhan will be moved to the eastern city of Nanjing.

Wuhan was supposed to host China, Taiwan, Thailand and Australia for the Group B qualifiers between February 3-9.

The football confederation said the change was proposed by the Chinese Football Association. 

Taiwan’s football association had warned earlier that it would withdraw from the qualifiers if they were held in Wuhan.

Before news of the cancellation, the Australian women’s soccer team said it was still preparing for its trip to Wuhan. 

Japan’s Kyodo news agency today also announced a boxing qualifier held in Wuhan for the same Olympics would be cancelled.

Citing organisers, Kyodo said the qualifiers would be rescheduled and moved from Wuhan.

There was no independent confirmation from the organisers, and Japan’s boxing federation said it was waiting to hear from the International Olympic Committee on the reported cancellation.

Kyodo said the IOC was expected to announce a new host and schedule for the qualifiers.

Scores of Chinese residents have been turning to an online plague simulation game and a disaster movie called ‘The Flu’ amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Plague Inc, a strategy simulation app by UK-based Ndemic creations, was today the top-paid game on the iOS operating system on China’s Apple Store. It allows users to create and evolve a pathogen to destroy the world.

‘The best way to conquer fear is to confront fear,’ said one commentator on China’s Twitter-like Weibo.

‘Isn’t this actually joining the evil force if you cannot beat the evil force?’ joked another.

South Korean disaster flick ‘The Flu’ was also the most searched-for movie on Chinese media review and social networking site Douban. 

A documentary on the 2003 SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak topped TV searches.

Furthermore, 11 out of 14 top-ranked articles on content platform Toutiao were related to pneumonia, as were over half of the 50 most-read topics on China’s Twitter-like Weibo.

‘There have been some announcements this morning about flights that come direct from the affected region to Heathrow with some additional measures there,’ he told Sky News. 

‘At the moment Public Health England have moved this from ‘very low’ to ‘low’ but obviously we want to stay ahead of the issue so we are keeping a very close eye on it. 

‘Initially this is to ensure that when flights come in directly into Heathrow there is a separate area for people to arrive in.’

Mr Shapps told BBC Radio 5 Live Health Secretary Matt Hancock will announce a package of precautionary measures later.

Though not confirmed, a Government source has reportedly told the BBC the measures will include:

Chinese officials have today urged travellers to stop visiting Wuhan, a city home to 11million people. Residents have even been urged to avoid getting into crowds to try and stop the spread of the virus. 

China’s National Health Commission vice-minister Li Bin said: ‘Basically, do not go to Wuhan. And those in Wuhan please do not leave the city.’

In the same public briefing, he also warned there is a possibility the virus – which has yet to be officially named – will mutate, warning it could mean a further spread of the disease.

2009 Swine flu epidemic 

In 2009 ‘Swine flu’ was identified for the first time in Mexico and was named because it is a similar virus to one which affects pigs. The outbreak is believed to have killed as many as 575,400 people – the H1N1 strain is now just accepted as normal seasonal flu.

2014 Poliovirus resurgence

Poliovirus began to resurface in countries where it had once been eradicated, and the WHO called for a widespread vaccination programme to stop it spreading. Cameroon, Pakistan and Syria were most at risk of spreading the illness internationally. 

2014 Ebola outbreak

Ebola killed at least 11,000 people across the world after it spread like wildfire through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in 2014, 2015 and 2016. More than 28,000 people were infected in what was the worst ever outbreak of the disease.

2016 Zika outbreak

Zika, a tropical disease which can cause serious birth defects if it infects pregnant women, was the subject of an outbreak in Brazil’s capital, Rio de Janeiro, in 2016. There were fears that year’s Olympic Games would have to be cancelled after more than 200 academics wrote to the World Health Organization warning about it.

2019 Ebola outbreak 

Almost 4,000 people were struck down with the killer virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo last year. More than 2,000 patients died. WHO officials refused to declare it an emergency three times before making a U-turn.

Li said: ‘There has already been human-to-human transmission and infection of medical workers. Evidence has shown that the disease has been transmitted through the respiratory tract and there is the possibility of viral mutation.’

The World Health Organisation (WHO) is expected to declare the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in a meeting held in Geneva today. 

If the UN body declares it an emergency, it will be just the sixth time in history that it has happened.

The only other outbreaks to have been granted such a status include the 2009 Swine flu epidemic, the resurgence of Polio in 2014, the worldwide spread of Zika in 2016 and the two most recent Ebola outbreaks in 2014 and last year. 

Infectious disease scientists across Asia are concerned China could be covering up the true amount of cases of the coronavirus. 

Piotr Chlebicki, at Mount Alvernia Hospital in Singapore, told South China Morning Post it was ‘hard to believe [the official number of] cases’. 

He added: ‘China has a track record of under-reporting cases, so the true picture may be completely different.’ 

The newspaper reported experts are concerned about the number of bureaucratic steps – put in place after the 2003 SARS outbreak – before a case can be confirmed. 

The virus has caused alarm because it is from the same family of viruses as SARS, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen today urged China to release all information about the outbreak of a new virus and work with Taiwan on curbing its spread.

At China’s insistence, Taiwan is not a member of the World Health Organization and is not allowed to participate in any of its meetings. However, large numbers of Taiwanese travel to and live in China. 

Travellers from the area of China at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak will be separated from other passengers on arrival at Heathrow Airport as UK health chiefs step up their response.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has said Public Health England is putting in place new precautions in relation to travellers to the UK from the region. 

‘There have been some announcements this morning about flights that come direct from the affected region to Heathrow with some additional measures there,’ he told Sky News. 

‘At the moment Public Health England have moved this from ‘very low’ to ‘low’ but obviously we want to stay ahead of the issue so we are keeping a very close eye on it. 

‘Initially this is to ensure that when flights come in directly into Heathrow there is a separate area for people to arrive in.’

Mr Shapps told BBC Radio 5 Live Health Secretary Matt Hancock will announce a package of precautionary measures later.

Though not confirmed, a Government source has reportedly told the BBC the measures will include:

Tsai said: ‘I especially want to urge China, being a member of international society, that it should fulfill its responsibilities to make the situation of the outbreak transparent, and to share accurate information on the outbreak with Taiwan.’ 

One case of the coronavirus has been confirmed in Taiwan, which is home to 23million people.   

Sharing information is also important for the health of the Chinese population and Beijing ‘should not put political concerns above the protection of its own people,’ Tsai said.

China regards Taiwan as its own territory and says it is not entitled to representation in most international bodies. 

Taiwan, where one case of the coronavirus has been detected, has called on people not to visit Wuhan unless they absolutely have to.

Scores of Chinese residents have been turning to an online plague simulation game and a disaster movie called ‘The Flu’ amid the coronavirus outbreak, it can be revealed.

Plague Inc, a strategy simulation app by UK-based Ndemic creations, was today the top-paid game on the iOS operating system on China’s Apple Store. It allows users to create and evolve a pathogen to destroy the world.

‘The best way to conquer fear is to confront fear,’ said one commentator on China’s Twitter-like Weibo.

‘Isn’t this actually joining the evil force if you cannot beat the evil force?’ joked another.

South Korean disaster flick ‘The Flu’ was also the most searched-for movie on Chinese media review and social networking site Douban.

A documentary on the 2003 SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak topped TV searches.

Companies across China were today handing out masks and warning staff to avoid the central Chinese city of Wuhan.

At Foxconn’s Lunar New Year party on Wednesday, founder Terry Gou advised Taiwan-based employees not to visit mainland China during the week-long holiday period.

‘Colleagues and their families who have come back from Wuhan are all in isolation at home. The infection is spreading very fast,’ Mr Gou added.

Company workers in Wuhan, the centre of the outbreak, have been wearing facemasks and getting their temperature checked, the Apple supplier also said.

Huawei Technologies has asked staff to reduce travel to Wuhan and avoid contact with animals, adding that it had set up an outbreak prevention and control team in the city to carry out disinfecting activities.

Citic Securities and investment bank China International Capital Corp have asked employees to avoid trips to Wuhan and Hubei province, where the city is located, if they can.

Citic has also asked staff to voluntarily quarantine themselves if they do travel to Hubei. HSBC said it had advised employees that travel to Wuhan could continue but has asked them to be extra vigilant.

Didi Chuxing, China’s largest ride-hailing company, said this week it would issue masks and disinfectant to its drivers and would allow passengers and drivers in Wuhan to cancel trips for free in the days up to January 31.

Furthermore, 11 out of 14 top-ranked articles on content platform Toutiao were related to pneumonia, as were over half of the 50 most-read topics on China’s Twitter-like Weibo.

Companies across China were today handing out masks and warning staff to avoid the central Chinese city of Wuhan.

At Foxconn’s Lunar New Year party on Wednesday, founder Terry Gou advised Taiwan-based employees not to visit mainland China during the week-long holiday period.

‘Colleagues and their families who have come back from Wuhan are all in isolation at home. The infection is spreading very fast,’ Mr Gou added.

Company workers in Wuhan, the centre of the outbreak, have been wearing facemasks and getting their temperature checked, the Apple supplier also said.

Huawei Technologies has asked staff to reduce travel to Wuhan and avoid contact with animals, adding that it had set up an outbreak prevention and control team in the city to carry out disinfecting activities.

Citic Securities and investment bank China International Capital Corp have asked employees to avoid trips to Wuhan and Hubei province, where the city is located, if they can.

Citic has also asked staff to voluntarily quarantine themselves if they do travel to Hubei. HSBC said it had advised employees that travel to Wuhan could continue but has asked them to be extra vigilant.

Didi Chuxing, China’s largest ride-hailing company, said this week it would issue masks and disinfectant to its drivers and would allow passengers and drivers in Wuhan to cancel trips for free in the days up to January 31.

Thai officials today confirmed a fourth case, a 73-year-old woman who developed a fever after returning from Wuhan. 

A leading Chinese doctor investigating the killer coronavirus yesterday admitted he has caught the SARS-like infection.

Wang Guangfa, who heads the department of pulmonary medicine at Beijing’s Peking University First Hospital, was part of a team of experts that earlier this month visited Wuhan, where the virus first emerged.

‘I was diagnosed and my condition is fine,’ Dr Wang told Kong’s Cable TV. He said he is receiving treatment and will have an ‘injection’ soon.

Dr Guangfa is one of the national experts that previously said the pneumonia-causing virus, which has never been seen before, was under control.

She was being monitored in an isolated ward in a hospital in Nakhon Pathom, 37 miles (60km) west of Bangkok.

In a message to the country, Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul said: ‘We can control the situation. 

‘There have not been cases of human-to-human transmission in Thailand because we detected the patients as soon as they arrived.’

Saying there are no reports of the infection spreading to others, he added: ‘We checked all of them: taxi drivers, people who wheeled the wheelchairs for the patients, doctors and nurses who worked around them.’

Two other Chinese patients in Thailand have recovered and been sent home, while a third will return once tests show he is clear of the virus. One of the four patients was a Thai national.

Thai officials have stepped up screening at airports to look for passengers with high body temperatures, coughs, headaches and trouble breathing. 

The Chinese-ruled gambling hub of Macau today confirmed its first case of the coronavirus – A 52-year-old Wuhan businesswoman. 

She took a high-speed train to the Chinese city of Zhuhai on January 19, then a shuttlebus to Macau. She had dinner with two friends, then went to the hotel and spent a long time in casinos. 

She was in a stable condition in an isolation ward. Her two friends were also being monitored and were in isolation.

Officials quickly moved to tighten temperature screening measures in casinos and around the city. A total of 405 guest entrances and 47 staff entrances have been provided with portable screening devices and all casino staff have to wear surgical masks. 

Donald Trump says America has a plan to contain the spread of a deadly new virus from China after the first case was confirmed in the states. 

The President, speaking at Davos in Switzerland where he is attending the World Economic Forum, praised the Centers for Disease Control and said the situation was being handled ‘very well’.

The first case of coronavirus was confirmed in Washington state on Tuesday when an unnamed man in his 30s was hospitalized after returning home from China.  

All performers and staff at the events hosted across Macau will be screened.

Entry points into Macau will also have temperature checks and visitors will be asked to fill in a health declaration form.

The tourist-magnet casino industry in Macau, which returned to Chinese rule in 1999, accounts for more than 80 per cent of the revenue in the city of 600,000 people. Macau is a popular Lunar New Year destination for mainland Chinese. 

Officials have today announced football and boxing qualifying matches held in Wuhan for the Tokyo Olympic Games will be moved from Wuhan.

Wuhan is at the centre of the ever-growing outbreak, which has sickened at least 450 people across Asia and spread to US. 

The Asian Football Confederation today said the women’s qualifiers being held at Wuhan will be moved to the eastern city of Nanjing.

A Chinese hospital has released first pictures of doctors treating patients who have been struck down by a new deadly virus.

Images shared by the Central Hospital of Wuhan, where the virus originated, show medics donning hazmat suits attending to the sufferers at the hospital’s intensive care units.

The never-before-seen pictures were taken inside the intensive care units of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of the hospital in Wuhan. 

The killer coronavirus sweeping across the world may have come from bats, scientists have said.

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the People’s Liberation Army and Institut Pasteur of Shanghai came to the conclusion.

In a statement, the team said: ‘The Wuhan coronavirus’ natural host could be bats… but between bats and humans there may be an unknown intermediate.

Tests of the virus, which has yet to be named, have revealed it targets a protein called ACE2 – just like its cousin SARS, the South China Morning Post reported.

Tracing the evolution of the virus, the team of experts found it belonged to betacoronavirus, making it structurally similar to SARS.

Authorities have pointed the blame on food markets in Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak that scientists are scrambling to contain.

Rodents and bats among other animals are slaughtered and sold in traditional ‘wet markets’, which tourists flock to see the ‘real’ side of the country.

Viruses – including ones carried by animals – are constantly changing and may over time become strong enough to infect humans.

Wuhan was supposed to host China, Taiwan, Thailand and Australia for the Group B qualifiers between February 3-9.

The football confederation said the change was proposed by the Chinese Football Association. 

Taiwan’s football association had warned earlier that it would withdraw from the qualifiers if they were held in Wuhan.

Before news of the cancellation, the Australian women’s soccer team said it was still preparing for its trip to Wuhan. 

Japan’s Kyodo news agency today also announced a boxing qualifier held in Wuhan for the same Olympics would be cancelled.

Citing organisers, Kyodo said the qualifiers would be rescheduled and moved from Wuhan.

There was no independent confirmation from the organisers, and Japan’s boxing federation said it was waiting to hear from the International Olympic Committee on the reported cancellation.

Kyodo said the IOC was expected to announce a new host and schedule for the qualifiers.   

The killer coronavirus sweeping across the world may have come from bats, scientists have said.

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the People’s Liberation Army and Institut Pasteur of Shanghai came to the conclusion.

In a statement, the team said: ‘The Wuhan coronavirus’ natural host could be bats… but between bats and humans there may be an unknown intermediate.

Tests of the virus, which has yet to be named, have revealed it targets a protein called ACE2 – just like its cousin SARS, the South China Morning Post reported.

Tracing the evolution of the virus, the team of experts found it belonged to betacoronavirus, making it structurally similar to SARS.

Authorities have pointed the blame on food markets in Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak that scientists are scrambling to contain.

Rodents and bats among other animals are slaughtered and sold in traditional ‘wet markets’, which tourists flock to see the ‘real’ side of the country.

Viruses – including ones carried by animals – are constantly changing and may over time become strong enough to infect humans.

What is this virus?

The virus has been identified as a new type of coronavirus. 

Coronaviruses are a large family of pathogens, most of which cause mild respiratory infections such as the common cold. 

But coronaviruses can also be deadly. SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, is caused by a coronavirus and killed hundreds of people in China and Hong Kong in the early 2000s.

Why hasn’t it been named yet?

The virus has not been named, although it commonly goes by ‘nCoV2019’, which stands for novel (new) coronavirus 2019.

When a virus emerges slowly, as this one has, scientists have to work quickly to understand its severity, how it is spread and how deadly it is.

Jeremy Farrar, a specialist in infectious disease epidemics and director of the Wellcome Trust global health charity, said he thinks the virus will be named over the coming weeks and months because it is the ‘least important decision at the moment’.

He added that it was unlikely to be named after Wuhan because it would suggest blame.

He told MailOnline: ‘Ebola was named after the Ebola river in the Congo. We’ve moved on from that because people didn’t want to associate them with cities and towns for the sense of blame.’ 

What symptoms does it cause?

Its symptoms are typically a fever, cough and trouble breathing, but some patients have developed pneumonia, a potentially life-threatening infection that causes inflammation of the small air sacs in the lungs.

People carrying the novel coronavirus may only have mild symptoms, such as a sore throat. They may assume they have a common cold and not seek medical attention, experts fear.

How is it detected?

When the outbreak started in December 2019, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission said hospitals across the city had treated a ‘successive series of patients with unexplained pneumonia’.

After investigations, a never-before-seen strain of coronavirus was identified and reported on January 9.

The virus’s genetic sequencing was released by scientists in China to the rest of the world to enable other countries to quickly diagnose potential new cases. This helps other countries respond quickly to disease outbreaks. 

To contain the virus, airports are detecting infected people with temperature checks. But as with every virus, it has an incubation period, meaning detection is not always possible because symptoms have not appeared yet.

The incubation period of nCov2019 is not known. Research by Imperial College London suggested there is a 10-day window between someone being infected and showing symptoms, based on the evidence so far. 

Can it kill?

Six people have so far died after testing positive for the virus. The first two patients who died suffered other health problems, so it is possible the virus is more lethal in vulnerable people.

The first patient, a 61-year-old-man, had abdominal tumours and chronic liver disease. The second, who was 69, had severe cardiomyopathy – a heart condition, abnormal kidney function, and seriously damaged organs. 

How is it spread?

Investigations have focused on animals as the source because the majority of the first infected patients in Wuhan were traced to the Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market.

On January 14, the World Health Organization said there is some ‘limited’ human-to-human transmission of the virus.

Professor Zhong Nanshan, a renowned scientist at China’s National Health Commission, said human-to-human transmission is ‘affirmative’, in a press conference on January 20.

Two patients in southern China caught the virus from infected family members, according to local media. They had not visited Wuhan.

Why has a seafood market been closed?

Authorities also closed Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market in Wuhan city since January 1 because the majority of the first infected patients had worked or visited there.

‘Environmental samples’ taken from the market tested positive for the virus, Wuhan health authorities said.

The first patient diagnosed with the novel strain, who was also the first death, was a regular customer at the seafood market on Wuhan’s outskirts.

What are countries doing to prevent the spread?

China has rapidly strengthened its capacity to prepare for and respond to public health threats, Dr Takeshi Kasai, the WHO’s regional director for the Western Pacific wrote in an Nikkei Asian Review article. 

Countries in Asia that have stepped up airport surveillance include Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines.

Australia and the US are also screening patients for a high temperature, but the UK is not yet. 

Is it similar to anything we’ve ever seen before?

Memories remain strong of the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The 2002-2003 SARS epidemic started in southern China and killed more than 700 people in mainland China, Hong Kong and elsewhere. But no cases have been recorded in the world since 2004.

Scientists first thought that only animals transmitted SARS to humans. But it soon became apparent that SARS could spread between humans – much like the new coronavirus.

The WHO criticised China for under-reporting the number of cases following the outbreak, which infected four people in the UK.

Similarly, it took ‘a while’ for scientists to spot that MERS – could be spread between people. Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome (MERS) is believed to be transmitted to humans from dromedary camels, but the original host may have been bats. 

MERS killed around 35 per cent of about 2,500 people who have been infected.

Yesterday, it was announced that:

Professor Zhong Nanshan, leader of the National Health Commission’s expert team, revealed the virus is likely to be spread by saliva in a press conference today.

He told the meeting: ‘As of now, it is affirmative that the new strain of coronavirus can be passed between humans. 

‘The virus is spread through respiratory system and distance of impact is not long, but it is possible that the virus was passed after being stuck to saliva.’

Professor Zhong said officials must ‘quarantine the patients and stop them from contacting others’. Antibiotics will not tackle the virus because the drugs only work on bacterial infections.

And he added that the outbreak will not spread like SARS, so long as patients are quarantined immediately and their contacts are traced.   

A Chinese physician who was investigating the outbreak of a mysterious new virus in central China says he has himself been infected, it was revealed this evening.

Wang Guangfa, who heads the Department of Pulmonary Medicine at Beijing’s Peking University First Hospital, was part of a team of experts that earlier this month visited Wuhan.

‘I was diagnosed and my condition is fine,’ Wang told Kong’s Cable TV on Tuesday, thanking people for their concern. He is receiving treatment in hospital.

A leading expert yesterday told MailOnline the new Chinese coronavirus may have been lurking in animals for decades.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a renowned specialist in infectious disease epidemics, said the virus isn’t new but has likely adapted to infect humans. 

Reports also state face masks are flying off the shelves across China as the country’s citizens prepare themselves for the potential spread of the outbreak, which has already swept the nation.

Pictures and videos circulating on the country’s social media show residents in various cities queuing to stock up on the medical products. 

On Weibo, the Chinese equivalent to Twitter, web users reported to have seen huge lines of customers in and outside pharmacies in hope of buying the sought-after item. 

Prices for face masks have surged, according a report from Beijing Evening News.

Some vendors on the country’s e-commerce site have increased the price of the N95 masks – which is made by US company 3M and particularly popular in China – from 99 yuan (£11) a box to nearly 1,000 yuan (£110) a box, the report said.

A topic page titled ‘the main force of buying face masks’ on Weibo has attracted around 570million clicks as the Chinese netizens discuss the apparent nationwide buying spree.  

Professor John Oxford, a virologist at Queen Mary College, yesterday admitted he was ‘quaking in my shoes’ over the potential spread of the virus that could happen over the Chinese New Year.

He told LBC: ‘None of us have faced a new virus faced with so many people in a community travelling around. 

‘That’s what’s going to happen in China at the end of the week. Once they are close together in taxis or small rooms, then there may be a problem.’  

And Professor Oxford added: ‘The only way to stop it is physical cleaning and social distance – keeping away from people.’  

Locals have made more than four million trips by train, road and air since January 10 in the annual travel rush for the most important holiday in the country.

The transport peak season will last until February 18 and see three billion trips made within China, according to official statistics.

People in China have been urged not to panic and to try and enjoy the festive season.

A piece in Chinese newspaper the Global Times said on Sunday: ‘The entire Chinese society should be vigilant but should not be in panic. 

‘We should make the upcoming Spring Festival happy and peaceful, and also pay close attention to every link where the pneumonia may increase transmission.’

Families of sicked loved who have died of mystery respiratory diseases in recent weeks believe the true number of cases and deaths is far higher than what China has admitted, The Guardian reported yesterday.

On the microblog Weibo, Wuhan residents have shared stories of family members who had shown symptoms of the virus, but not been tested for it at hospital.

One posted images of her mother’s diagnosis of viral pneumonia and described long queues of patients with similar symptoms late on Monday night, none of whom appeared to have been tested for coronavirus. 

‘Could all these people suddenly have viral pneumonia?’ she said. 

Australian officials yesterday announced a traveller had been placed in quarantine with symptoms of the virus after returning home from a trip to China.

The man is being kept at his home in Brisbane as he awaits test results for the virus. Earlier tests were inconclusive, Queensland health chiefs said.

The suspected case prompted Prime Minister Scott Morrison to warn Australians travelling to China to ‘exercise a high degree of caution’ in China’s Wuhan area. 

The Philippines also announced that it was investigating its first potential case of the coronavirus.

A five-year-old child arrived in the country on January 12 from Wuhan and has since been hospitalised with flu symptoms.

While the child tested positive for a virus, authorities in Manila said they were not sure if it was the same one that has killed six people in China. 



Source By Breaking News Website | BreakingNews.WS